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Forgive my haterade clicktivism, but we don’t need these new words

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New coinages that reflect the latest wave of online political activism form a significant section of more than 300 new definitions in the database, which is a sister work to the Oxford English Dictionary.

Additions including “clicktivism” (a pejorative word for armchair activists on social media), “haterade” (excessive negativity, criticism, or resentment), “otherize” (view or treat – a person or group of people – as intrinsically different from and alien to oneself) and “herd mentality” (the tendency for people’s behaviour or beliefs to conform to those of the group to which they belong) all emerged during the 2016 battle for the White House, said head of content development Angus Stevenson.

Who exactly is the gatekeeper?:

“Craptacular” (remarkably poor and disappointing), “bronde” (hair dyed both blond and brunette) and “fitspiration” (a person or thing that serves as motivation for someone to sustain or improve health and fitness) all made the cut.

Here is the Guardian story by Danuta Kean.

The post Forgive my haterade clicktivism, but we don’t need these new words appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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IainBertram
115 days ago
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The oxford dictionary records all words in usage in published written English. There is no gate keeper.
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4 public comments
fxer
115 days ago
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Herd mentality is new? That can't be right, lemmings
Bend, Oregon
superiphi
115 days ago
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it's not about "do we need" - if these are finding significant use, they will be recorded
Idle, Bradford, United Kingdom
duerig
116 days ago
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Nobody is the gatekeeper. Welcome to the English language.

Honestly, it is probably for the best that we don't have a government institute defining our language like the french. I think that would be a yuuuge problem...
gradualepiphany
116 days ago
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Uh. Haterade was in full use when I was a teenager in NC in the 90s.
Los Angeles, California, USA

Bugger

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Bugger

Today we’re saying hello to scifi author Orson Scott Card, by means of a giant flaming finger of fuck held aloft in his homophobic direction. Love the man’s writing but I can’t read it anymore without hating myself.

Seriously, guys, have you bought SFAM 2 yet? Why are you still waiting? it’s not going to get any more awesome.

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IainBertram
1463 days ago
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Snort!
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The Collected Iain M Banks

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The Collected Iain M Banks

Today’s SFAM is a tribute to the works of Iain M Banks, recently deceased and author of numerous books including the excellent Culture series. Lucky for us, his work lives on. Perhaps he will again one day as well.

Hey! You! Would you please buy my new book? I need to purchase food. Thanks!

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IainBertram
1465 days ago
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A fitting afterlife
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June 16, 2013

7 Comments and 16 Shares

Thanks to your contributions I will be doing a drawathon Wednesday. My first with a tablet.
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IainBertram
1469 days ago
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Too True!
popular
1468 days ago
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jstone13zero
1468 days ago
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At least he didn't have to use WebAssign.
jlvanderzwan
1469 days ago
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Hey look, it's me!
hylkdh
1467 days ago
:D
Michdevilish
1469 days ago
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There you go
you're so slow
a no go is a no go
if you blow, you blow
Alas
Canada

Bike helmets: an emergency doctor's perspective

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Mandatory helmets are seen as being good enough for motorcyclists, but what about pedal cyclists?

For those working on the frontline of trauma care, the findings of a report into the protective effects of helmets in cyclists and motorcyclists published in the Medical Journal of Australia last week come as no surprise.

When an ambulance arrives at an emergency department with a cyclist injured on the road, a clinician needs to first know a few important details. How old is the patient? What are the vital signs? And finally … were they wearing a helmet?

That’s because ambulance officers, doctors and nurses have known for a long time that if a helmet is not being worn at the time a head strikes the road, pavement or cycleway, the chances of severe head injury are much higher.

Now this been shown in a one-year study I conducted, with two colleagues, of injured cyclists and motorcyclists presenting to seven major trauma centres in Sydney.

The risks of severe head injury were more than five times higher in cyclists not wearing a helmet compared to helmeted ones, and more than three times higher in motorcyclists not wearing a helmet at the time of injury.

Severe head injuries were defined as any with significant brain haemorrhage, complex skull fracture or brain swelling.

Some 70% of such patients end up on a ventilator in intensive care units; many patients with severe head injuries are left with permanent brain damage.

It’s estimated that each new case of severe brain injury costs Australia A$4.5 million.

But it’s the things that can’t be calculated that are perhaps more crippling – the long-term personality changes, the seizures, the post-traumatic adjustment, and the interminable stress on family and carers.

judy_and_ed

Conflicting studies

Australia is one of the few countries in the world with mandatory helmet laws protecting both motorcyclists and pedal cyclists.

While helmet use in motorbike riders is generally accepted, compulsory helmet laws have been resisted by many experts.

Many argue that helmet use simply deters people from dusting off their two wheelers and pedalling their way to better health.

Using a telephone survey, Professor Chris Rissel from the University of Sydney concluded that cycling rates could increase dramatically if mandatory helmet laws in Sydney were repealed.

In contrast, a recent National Heart Foundation survey showed that overall road safety, road speed and the presence of dedicated bike paths were the main obstacles limiting bicycle use.

Only 17% of respondents identified helmet use as a potential factor.

Turning the tables on rotational injury

Publicised court cases testing Australian helmet laws have even invoked limited autopsy reports hypothesising the effect of helmets imparting “rotational forces” on the brain, causing diffuse axonal injury.

Diffuse axonal injury is widespread (rather than focused) damage to the brain, and is one of the major causes of unconsciousness and persistent vegetative state following head trauma.

The argument here is helmets apparently exacerbate head injury severity by causing the head to twist quickly on impact, thus creating rotational forces on the brain.

There have been no controlled studies in the clinical setting into the association between helmet use and diffuse axonal injury – until now.

We found no reports of diffuse axonal injury in pedal cyclists, helmeted or non-helmeted, and only a marginal increase in such diagnoses in non-helmeted motorcyclists.

Definitely worth helmet hair

This Sydney-based study was the first to place motorcyclists and pedal cyclists side by side and demonstrated that the protective role of helmets in both groups are important – and even better in pedal cyclists.

Helmet hair is a small price to pay for protection. mrlerone

These results are within the range reported by a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review on the subject as well as a study of more than 13,000 pedal cyclists in France published in 2012.

Some experts against this type of observational research cite small sample sizes, and flaws inherent in case control studies, such as not being able to take into account factors such as speed and intoxication.

But it is also true that the very same type of observational study designs was the basis on which the association between smoking and lung cancer was first described.

Once you get enough studies pointing in the one direction, the signal becomes harder to refute.

If mandatory helmets are good enough for motorcyclists, they’re certainly good enough for pedal cyclists.

And as more and more people use bicycles to go to work, work up a sweat or just spend time with the kids, they can rest assured that the helmet resting comfortably on their head is doing something much more than simply disrupting their hairdo.

Michael Dinh does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.

The Conversation
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IainBertram
1508 days ago
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03/20/13 PHD comic: 'How irreplaceable are you?'

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Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
Click on the title below to read the comic
title: "How irreplaceable are you?" - originally published 3/20/2013

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

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IainBertram
1555 days ago
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Damn he's good!
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